Category Archives: Abuse / Violence

We…The humans.

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En bref: César Polanski

Il y a donc actuellement un appel au boycott de la cérémonie des Césars après que le comité est décidé de faire honneur à Polanski en lui offrant le boulot de président pour cette année. Un honneur mérité pour son travail mais aussi, et surement, pour avoir admis sa culpabilité après qu’il ait drogué et violé une fille de 13 ans.

L’ancienne Ministre de la Culture s’exprimait donc sur le sujet en disant que “C’est une chose qui s’est passée il y a 40 ans. On ne peut pas continuer à parler de ça à chaque fois qu’on parle de lui parce que ça appartient maintenant au passé. C’est juste une cérémonie.”

Si c’est “juste” une cérémonie, pourquoi son boycott vous pose-t-il un tel problème?

Le mot “juste” implique l’absence total d’intérêt véritable à accorder à cette mascarade d’auto-féliciation dont tout le monde se fiche, à part les femmes, qui “ne regardent que pour les robes.”, n’est-ce pas?

Il est clair que non, vous ne considérez pas ça comme “juste” une cérémonie sinon vous n’auriez pas fait ce genre de déclaration méprisante et insultante. Et bien, les gens qui appellent au boycott pensent comme vous: c’est une cérémonie qui compte et le message envoyé à travers la nomination de Polanski comme président est important.

Le temps effacera votre contribution à la culture français mais ce n’est pas à lui d’effacer les crimes du passé, ni à vous d’en décider mais à une justice duement rendue, ce qui n’est jamais arrivé dans le cas de Polanski malgré ses aveux. Et il le sait lui-même, ayant, depuis quarante, vécu de pays en pays au fil de l’humeur de ces derniers au sujet de la demande d’extradition vers les Etats-Unis. Une demande que le temps n’a pas pu effacer.

Le fait que cet homme qui n’a pas le courage de ces actes d’ignominie soit sur le point de donner un prix à un film qui parle d’une victime de viol cherchant la vengeance est assez pour demander le boycott de la cérémonie.

In Brief: César Polanski

There is a call to boycott the French equivalent of the Oscars, Les Césars, because the committee thought it would be a good idea to hand over the hosting to a man who pleaded guilty to drugging and raping a 13 year-old girl.

A call to which the former French Ministre de la Culture replied: “It’s something that happened 40 years ago. One cannot bring up this affair every time we talk about him because there was a problem back then. It is just an awards ceremony.”

If it’s “just a ceremony”, why do you care so much as to comment upon its boycott? The word “just” implies its lack of significance, it’s yet another tedious, self-congratulating event no one really cares about and women only watch for the dresses so what’s the fuss, hey?

Clearly, it’s not “just” a ceremony and you do take issue. Well, so do the people who think that time is not what brings closure to crimes. A properly served justice does. Which never happened in that case. And Polanski knows it, having moved from countries to countries for the past 40 years, according to how said countries are dealing with the on-going extradition demand from the US.

The fact that he will certainly be handing the big prize to a movie about a rape victim seeking revenge is worth a boycott, yes.

Freedom of speech is not a jail-free card.

Let’s get straight to the point and let me say that not every opinion that pops into your head is worth being expressed as it popped and freedom of speech is never some kind of wildcard for these thoughts to be worth anything.

Sure, it’s easy to just splash out everything that comes to our mind willy-nilly under the umbrella that we live in democracies and it’s therefore our right to do so. We can all do it because we are all humans, we all have our moods and all feel strongly about this and that.

For argument’s sake, I can take to Twitter and troll every religious stranger I find and call them names until the letters disappear from my keyboard because I am gay and therefore unfairly oppressed by every single religious authority in the world. My freedom of speech entitles me to retaliate, no matter how violently I strike even people who are innocent, didn’t say anything and never asked for trouble. I can also use every opportunity to scream and shout that Trump is an old twat with the face and the hair of a kangaroo’s scrotum, with policies and moral standing to match because he represents everything I disagree with and, again, my country’s constitution entitles me to express my opinion, whichever.

On more trivial matters, it’s also my right to go on every Youtube channel I follow and spew brutal hatred everytime a Youtuber I watch makes a video that displeases me in any way – even small.

In other words, it’s my right to play by the alt-right rules of self-entitlement and encourage my peers to do what I do and harass everyone I feel to be inferior because different from me or in disagreement with me, to purposely look for things I know to hate and spam the dislike buttons before filling the comment sections with the cheapest, most homophobic, sexist, racist and xenophobic “opinions” – or insults as we commonly call them.

But I don’t, even when I experience red urge of hatred, like everyone does. I just don’t do it. And it’s not because I live in a yoghurt commercial where everything is bright and fabulous but because I have been taught, I have learnt and have understood where the line is between thinking something and expressing it and how to cross that line in an adult, respectable and respectful way. I have understood that when it’s perfectly okay to have these thought, when it’s your freedom to express your opinions, there is a way to do it that requires some extra work, yes.

Some will say I am censoring myself, that my leftist political correctness has left my dry and unable to have relevant opinions, that I am fake because I never really speak my mind but always coat it in sugar to offend anyone. No, I do speak my mind but I do reflect upon it and how to convey a useful message that keeps the essence of what I think without imposing myself on others through a series of word punches.

I could spam comment sections with anger, resentment, spite and petty hatred every time when aggravated but I have learnt to reflect and ask myself: What’s the point? What is violence in words going to bring to the debate expect even more anger and division? Are people really going to change their way because I have plainly attacked them? Have I ever changed my way under the weight of insults or have I instead become ever more determined to eventually be my true self because of these attacks?

I have learnt that nothing good ever comes out of speaking your mind as it is when it is solely negativity. I will go further and say that I have grown convinced that there is nothing in our society that actually justifies plainly cheap and purposely hurtful thoughts to be put into actual written or spoken words.

I know the answer to such remark: “Censorship! It’s my freedom of speech!” No, it is not. It’s just you trying to coat your complete lack of empathy and civility in yet another blanket of outrage and self-victimhood. How far will your anger lead you?

Vomiting everything your brain produces for everyone to see, read and hear is not freedom of speech. Doing so is called being childish and having missed the point of school as a place where you should have learnt there is a difference between personal life and social life. Your personal life is your family and friends where you are indeed not only entitled to an opinion but where you can decide the degree to which you want to express it. Your peers will then judge you for that in a way that will be on par with how you expressed yourself.

What is important to understand is that social life rhymes with social peace. It means that there are rules that need to be followed, while being positively challenged, all in a constructive way where you don’t deliberately antagonise everyone, rather work towards us evolving into even better beings as a whole. If you actually think we are better human beings without gay marriage and you want me to listen and respect your opinion, don’t bark it, don’t result to insulting me to justify my being treated like a second-class citizen. If you do, don’t blame me for not being heard.

Explain yourself, show your reasoning behind your opinion/passion and we’ll talk, we’ll debate in an attempt to build something. And quoting a book is not an explanation. It’s yet another blanket on top of freedom called religion. We are both sophisticated human beings that went to school, you should be able to express yourself in your own way without resulting to point blank out-of-context misquotes.

The need for a civilised conversation is not censorship or muzzling of anyone, it stems from the fact that unlike your family and friends who can cut you off and refuse to acknowledge you if they think you are toxic, society as a whole cannot ignore you. On the opposite, a democracy has the mission to include you so it teaches all of us that we have to live with you, interact with you, respect your despite our differences.

The social rules of speech are not here to censor you but to push you to evaluate and reformulate your raw thoughts in order to express it in a way that will bring something to the debate rather than a plain insult because you feel strongly about such and such topic.

It is true that in a world where freedom of speech justifies and forgives everything, even the most racist, homophobic, sexist, xenophobic insults thrown in air in a tantrum, that vision I just talked about is not the current trend, although it is important to point out that it is actually the most used. Not everyone spills hatred like an oil company spills oil. Companies, institutions that fire people for being openly, proudly, dangerously and threatenly racist are under attack for supposedly bridling freedom of speech with political correctness and I support them.

My way is depicted as “leftist”, “soft”, “ineffective”, “fake” and the reason why we it don’t and won’t win elections anymore, because it’s political correctness v freedom of speech. But I believe it goes together and if political correctness means acting like a grown-up and be articulate and mindful of one’s words for the sake of everyone, I am happy to be leftist, soft and political correct and so should everyone.